July 30, 2005

MORE THAN SUFFICIENT SCHEMES

If there’s ever been a band with invariably interesting off-shoot projects, it’s KING CRIMSON. When members of the Fripp stable go on a limb the results are always interesting, yet the conception of Ian Wallace looks more interesting than anything.CRIMSON JAZZ TRIO that, alongside Ian, include Jody Nardone on piano and bassist Tim Landers do what the name suggests and what was Wallace’s original idea, “to rearrange some of Crimson material in a jazz format”. In May, they did so – and the samples of the band’s work can be listened to on the new website. Bring out the album now!

BITS GATHERED FROM COINCIDENCE

For many years an enigma that those puzzled sought to solve even through the rubbish he took out, Bob Dylan went in the open now, at first with the “Biography” book and then with a Martin Scorsese picture “No Direction Home: Bob Dylan” that will make its screening debut in the US on September 26th. Not the first documentary on His Bobness, it’s the only one narrated by the bard all the way through and sprinkled with exclusive interviews with such close associates of his as Joan Baez, Allen Ginsberg and Pete Seeger.

Still, it’s the music that lies in the heart of any thing Dylan, so the movie is accompanied by “No Direction Home – The Soundtrack. The Bootleg Series Vol. 7”, out on August 30th. All bar two tracks previously unreleased, the 2CD-set is close in its content to the first installment of the archival series and, like other parts in-between, comes in a slipcase with a 60-page color book filled with liner notes by Andrew Loog Oldham and Al Kooper and the songs details.

CD 1:

1. When I Got Troubles (recorded by high-school friend, 1959)
2. Rambler, Gambler (Minneapolis, 1960)
3. This Land Is Your Land (Carnegie Chapter Hall, 1961)
4. Song To Woody (the “Bob Dylan” album, 1961)
5. Dink’s Song (“Minneapolis Hotel Tapes”, 1961)
6. I Was Young When I Left Home (“Minneapolis Hotel Tapes”, 1961)
7. Sally Gal (take #1, “The Freewheelin'” out-take, 1962)
8. Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright (“Witmark Demo”, 1963)
9. Man Of Constant Sorrow (TV show, 1963)
10. Blowin’ In The Wind (Town Hall, NY, 1963)
11. Masters Of War (Town Hall, NY, 1963)
12. A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (Carnegie Hal, 1963)
13. When The Ship Comes In (Carnegie Hall, 1963)
14. Mr. Tambourine Man (first complete take, “Another Side” sessions, 1964)
15. Chimes Of Freedom (Newport Folk Festival, 1964)
16. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue (take #1, “Bringing It All Back Home” sessions, 1965)

CD 2:

1. She Belongs To Me (remake take # 2, “Bringing It All Back Home” sessions, 1965)
2. Maggie’s Farm (Newport Folk Festival, 1965)
3. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry (take #9, “Highway 61 Revisited” sessions, 1965)
4. Tombstone Blues (take #9, “Highway 61 Revisited” sessions, 1965)
5. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues (take #5, “Highway 61 Revisited” sessions, 1965)
6. Desolation Row (take #1, “Highway 61 Revisited” sessions, 1965)
7. Highway 61 Revisited (take #6, “Highway 61 Revisited” sessions, 1965)
8. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat (take #1, “Blonde On Blonde” sessions, 1966)
9. Stuck Inside Of Mobile (take #5, “Blonde On Blonde” sessions, 1966)
10. Visions Of Johanna (take #8, “Blonde On Blonde” sessions, 1965)
11. Ballad Of A Thin Man (ABC Theatre, Edinburgh, 1966)
12. Like A Rolling Stone (Free Trade Hall, Manchester, 1966)

THE OLD HAND IS SLOW

It’s been quite a time since Eric Clapton presented his fans with an album of new songs, and though many think tackling Robert Johnson’s blues and playing Albert Hall with CREAM suit Slowhand better, he’s back with a bagful of – mostly – originals. “Back Home” is the title of the album that’ll see the light of day on August 30th. Eric must be in top form if he takes to covers again, as his covers always shine. This time he choose George Harrison’s optimistic “Love Comes To Everyone” and Stevie Wonder’s “I’m Going Left” originally recorded by Stevie’s wife Syreeta Wright. The band, up to the material if not more, include Steve Gadd in drums, Andy Fairweather-Low on guitar and Billy Preston on keyboards while among the special guests are Stevie Winwood and Pino Paladino. Hopefull, Clapton has made the best of the situation.

1. So Tired
2. Say What You Will
3. I’m Going Left
4. Love Don’t Love Nobody
5. Revolution
6. Lost And Found
7. Heaven
8. Love Comes To Everyone
9. One Day
10. One Track Mind
11. Run Home To Me
12. Back Home

WE’LL BE WATCHING ‘EM

No matter how Sting try to turn “Every Breath You Take” into a political statement, the song remains the domain of his old band, THE POLICE. Still missed two decades after the trio called it quits, any new bit of their history is welcomed, and the “Synchronicity Concert” DVD, to be released on September 5th, is a treasure. The film was shot in in November 1983 and, originally directed by 10CC’s Godley & Creme, now emerges in glorious video and audio that includes three mixes: Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound, and 2.0 Dolby Digital Stereo. But it’s the massive bonus section that draws the “indispensable” tag with it.

1. Intro
2. Synchronicity I
3. Walking In Your Footsteps
4. Message In A Bottle
5. Walking On The Moon
6. Wrapped Around Your Finger
7. Hole In my Life
8. King Of Pain
9. One World
10. Tea In The Sahara
11. Oh My God
12. De Do Do Do De Da Da Da
13. Every Breath You Take
14. Can’t Stand Losing You
15. Spirits In The Material World
16. So Lonely
Bonus Features:
Original Theatrical Trailer
Bonus Tracks – Montreal:
– Demolition Man
– Murder by Numbers
Melbourne interview, 1984, the very last show
multi-angle tracks – Atlanta:
– Synchronicity II
– Roxanne
– Invisible Sun
– Don’t Stand So Close To Me

July 30, 2005

Category(s): News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.